Harmful & Noxious Weeds Notice

Noxious weeds in Croyde and Georgeham!

It’s the ones growing on your land that you need to keep an eye on. While it is not an offence to allow the following ten “harmful weeds” and “invasive non-native plants” to grow on your land, it is necessary to prevent them spreading on to other people’s property or into the wild. Failure to control these species spreading from your land can result in a fine or prosecution.

Harmful weeds (Weeds Act 1959)

Common Ragwort Senecio Jacobaea is poisonous to horses, cattle, and sheep, hence really noxious!
In the first year after a seed germinates ragwort forms a rosette of leaves as in the photo below:

In its second year it produces yellow flowers and then a mass of seeds which blow away. It is fairly easy to pull up the plants before they set seed, or you can cut them down, and/or burn them on site, or, if you are qualified and certified to do so, spray them with herbicide.

Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense spreads by seed and by underground stems:

Spear Thistle Cirsium vulgare forms a first year rosette and seed the next year. Cutting before set seed is probably the best method of preventing spread. Both are not poisonous but clearly not desirable on grazed land or in hay:

Broad–leaved Dock Rumex obtusifolius and Curled Dock Rumex crispus are also classed as harmful weeds. They are difficult to eliminate but cutting before seeding will stop them spreading to neighbours’ land.

Invasive non-native plants (Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981)

Japanese Knotweed Fallopia japonica is perennial and spreads through underground stems (rhizomes) and can regrow from small fragments even though it does not set seed. It is very invasive. Digging out is possible, but as rhizomes grow deeply, regrowth usually occurs which needs destroying. This method also creates problems over disposal as Japanese knotweed is classed as ‘controlled waste’ under the Environmental Protection Act 1990. This requires disposal at licensed landfill sites. Alternatively, it can be destroyed on site by cutting or digging it repeatedly and burning it when dry. In this way the energy reserves in the remaining underground parts will be gradually exhausted; a process which may, however, take several seasons. Similarly treatment with herbicides will require several repeated applications. On no account should Japanese knotweed be included with normal household waste or put out in green waste collection schemes.

Himalayan Balsam is a major weed problem, especially on riverbanks and waste land, but can also invade gardens..
Himalayan Balsam grows rapidly from seed and spreads quickly, smothering other vegetation as it goes. It is fairly easy to pull up the plants before they set seed, or you can cut them down, or burn them on site, or, if you are qualified and certified to do so, spray them with herbicide. Before using weedkillers alongside waterways it is necessary to contact the Environment Agency. Additional weed seedlings will germinate after the parent plants are killed off so repeat treatments are necessary.

Rhododendron ponticum is a familiar species which should be controlled.

Giant Hogweed Heracleum mantegazzianum is not known to be in the parish but watch out as it has been seen near Combe Martin, see www.planttracker.org.uk

New Zealand Pigmyweed Crassula helmsi is an aquatic plant not known to be in the parish or county.

For more detail about the law and control measures click on www.gov.uk

Download Word version of this document Here:

Dr Eirene Williams CEnv FCIEEM(Rtd)
Robber’s Hall
Croyde
North Devon
EX33 1PL

T. 01271 890367

E. eirenendw@aol.com

Croyde & Combe Martin Inequality Project

To what extent do the villages of Croyde and Combe Martin, North Devon, experience socio-economic inequality?

A Level Geography NEA – Samuel Shackleton – January 2018

This study examines inequality between two picturesque villages of North Devon, Combe Martin and Croyde. Why do they experience different visitor numbers, crime rates and property prices? What do local residents and tourists think of each place?

They are completely different economically and environmentally. Croyde is a very touristy and expensive place to live, and is famous for its surfing beach, whereas Combe Martin has a tourist trade, but in my experience the dwellings, holiday accommodation, pub food etc are cheaper.

Through examining crime statistics, property prices, economic activity and occupations, second address statistics from the 2011 Census and perceptions of local residents and tourists, this study will show the extent to which there are differences between Combe Martin and Croyde, and begin to explain why these exist and how well they are being corrected.

We will find out that Combe Martin has nearly double the proportion of unemployed of Croyde and Croyde has twice the average house price than Combe Martin; while 50% of homes in Croyde are second addresses. We will also examine the Local Plans of the North Devon and Torridge District Councils, and see what each Parish Council has been doing to serve their village.

Click here to download and read the full dissertation:

Cold Weather Notice

School closures due to cold weather

With more cold weather expected this weekend parents are urged to sign up to our school closure email alert.

Once registered you will receive an email if the school has been closed due to winter weather.

To sign up click here, then enter your preferred email address and then click on the drop down, ticking the schools you want information on, then submit.

The service is just one way Devon County Council is keeping the public up to date this winter.

Winter travel

Winter service is an important part of our maintenance work and almost £5 million is spent each year on roads affected by winter weather. This involves salting major roads when there is a risk of ice, clearing snow and reacting to floods and fallen trees.

The Council’s contractor, Skanska has a workforce based at strategic locations to provide an effective response to any problems that may occur.

Despite our efforts, winter weather can still make roads treacherous. With over 90% of all crashes attributed to human error the real key to driving in winter is to drive with due care for the conditions. Never assume a road has been salted.

More information can be found in Travelling in Winter.

To find the latest information and travel advice from Devon County Council click here. For updates on Twitter follow @DevonAlert.