Croyde & Combe Martin Inequality Project

To what extent do the villages of Croyde and Combe Martin, North Devon, experience socio-economic inequality?

A Level Geography NEA – Samuel Shackleton – January 2018

This study examines inequality between two picturesque villages of North Devon, Combe Martin and Croyde. Why do they experience different visitor numbers, crime rates and property prices? What do local residents and tourists think of each place?

They are completely different economically and environmentally. Croyde is a very touristy and expensive place to live, and is famous for its surfing beach, whereas Combe Martin has a tourist trade, but in my experience the dwellings, holiday accommodation, pub food etc are cheaper.

Through examining crime statistics, property prices, economic activity and occupations, second address statistics from the 2011 Census and perceptions of local residents and tourists, this study will show the extent to which there are differences between Combe Martin and Croyde, and begin to explain why these exist and how well they are being corrected.

We will find out that Combe Martin has nearly double the proportion of unemployed of Croyde and Croyde has twice the average house price than Combe Martin; while 50% of homes in Croyde are second addresses. We will also examine the Local Plans of the North Devon and Torridge District Councils, and see what each Parish Council has been doing to serve their village.

Click here to download and read the full dissertation:

Devon and Cornwall Alert


 

Devon and Cornwall Alert

Devon and Cornwall Alert is a two-way community messaging system operated by Devon and Cornwall Police.

Devon and Cornwall Alert helps us to connect with our communities. it tells you what is happening in your area and allows you to respond directly with information for the police.

Chose what information you receive…

  • Crime
  • Anti-social behaviour
  • Witness appeals
  • Missing person appeals
  • Community events
  • Local good news

When, how and who from…

  • Specify what time of day messages will arrive
  • Email, text or telephone
  • Police, Action Fraud, Crimestoppers, Neighbourhood Watch
  • Free: no contract, cost or obligation
  • Devon, Cornwall and Isles of Scilly

Register online at alerts.dc.police.uk

 

 

 

Cold Weather Notice

School closures due to cold weather

With more cold weather expected this weekend parents are urged to sign up to our school closure email alert.

Once registered you will receive an email if the school has been closed due to winter weather.

To sign up click here, then enter your preferred email address and then click on the drop down, ticking the schools you want information on, then submit.

The service is just one way Devon County Council is keeping the public up to date this winter.

Winter travel

Winter service is an important part of our maintenance work and almost £5 million is spent each year on roads affected by winter weather. This involves salting major roads when there is a risk of ice, clearing snow and reacting to floods and fallen trees.

The Council’s contractor, Skanska has a workforce based at strategic locations to provide an effective response to any problems that may occur.

Despite our efforts, winter weather can still make roads treacherous. With over 90% of all crashes attributed to human error the real key to driving in winter is to drive with due care for the conditions. Never assume a road has been salted.

More information can be found in Travelling in Winter.

To find the latest information and travel advice from Devon County Council click here. For updates on Twitter follow @DevonAlert.

Parish Council Response to Boundary Commission

2 October 2017

By email to reviews@lgbce.org.uk

The Review Officer (North Devon)
Local Government Boundary Commission for England
14th floor
Millbank Tower
Millbank
London
SW1P 4QP

=========================

Dear Sir / Madam

SUBMISSION FOR GEORGEHAM PARISH COUNCIL TO THE BOUNDARY COMMISSION (Review of ward boundaries, North Devon)

Our proposal, in the light of the need of North Devon Council to redraw the Wards and lose 2 councillors, is that Knowle should be added to the current unit of the Parishes of Georgeham (including Croyde), Mortehoe / Woolacombe and West Down, to give the desired number of electors. Knowle and West Down are neighbours.

We understand there is a different proposal from North Devon Council. This involves splitting the current Ward and attaching Georgeham Parish to Braunton, further subdividing our Parish and splitting Croyde from Georgeham and placing these settlements into 2 different Braunton Wards, East and West.

Our Parish strongly disagrees with this proposal. We, like Mortehoe / Woolacombe, are both coastal parishes sharing most of the same problems and amenities – surfing beaches, an enormous influx of seasonal visitors, second homes, narrow roads, national Trust and AONB sites.

Georgeham Parish, which contains the two villages of Georgeham and Croyde and five hamlets has been a unit since 1261. We work hard to remain a community to function as a major holiday destination as well as having a resident community, with churches, a primary school, football team, shared leisure facilities, clubs etc. We have a parish magazine and are in the process of submitting a Neighbourhood Plan.

Our challenges and interests differ from those of Braunton. We feel that our interests could conflict with those of Braunton and we would lose the representation of those interests at District level, especially with the Parish being split between two different Braunton Councillors.

We note that the Commission wishes to “ensure that the new council Wards reflect as far as possible the interests and identities of communities across North Devon” and beg that you will consider our proposal, and our objections to the alternative, in this light.

We feel that while numerically proportional representation is needed nationally, community representation is more important locally.

Our proposal, to add Knowle to our current Ward, would satisfy both electoral number needs and those of our community.

Yours faithfully

Sue Squire

Parish Clerk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View the letter here in original Word format:

Harmful & Noxious Weeds Notice

Noxious weeds in Croyde and Georgeham!

It’s the ones growing on your land that you need to keep an eye on. While it is not an offence to allow the following ten “harmful weeds” and “invasive non-native plants” to grow on your land, it is necessary to prevent them spreading on to other people’s property or into the wild. Failure to control these species spreading from your land can result in a fine or prosecution.

Harmful weeds (Weeds Act 1959)

Common Ragwort Senecio Jacobaea is poisonous to horses, cattle, and sheep, hence really noxious!
In the first year after a seed germinates ragwort forms a rosette of leaves as in the photo below:

In its second year it produces yellow flowers and then a mass of seeds which blow away. It is fairly easy to pull up the plants before they set seed, or you can cut them down, and/or burn them on site, or, if you are qualified and certified to do so, spray them with herbicide.

Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense spreads by seed and by underground stems:

Spear Thistle Cirsium vulgare forms a first year rosette and seed the next year. Cutting before set seed is probably the best method of preventing spread. Both are not poisonous but clearly not desirable on grazed land or in hay:

Broad–leaved Dock Rumex obtusifolius and Curled Dock Rumex crispus are also classed as harmful weeds. They are difficult to eliminate but cutting before seeding will stop them spreading to neighbours’ land.

Invasive non-native plants (Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981)

Japanese Knotweed Fallopia japonica is perennial and spreads through underground stems (rhizomes) and can regrow from small fragments even though it does not set seed. It is very invasive. Digging out is possible, but as rhizomes grow deeply, regrowth usually occurs which needs destroying. This method also creates problems over disposal as Japanese knotweed is classed as ‘controlled waste’ under the Environmental Protection Act 1990. This requires disposal at licensed landfill sites. Alternatively, it can be destroyed on site by cutting or digging it repeatedly and burning it when dry. In this way the energy reserves in the remaining underground parts will be gradually exhausted; a process which may, however, take several seasons. Similarly treatment with herbicides will require several repeated applications. On no account should Japanese knotweed be included with normal household waste or put out in green waste collection schemes.

Himalayan Balsam is a major weed problem, especially on riverbanks and waste land, but can also invade gardens..
Himalayan Balsam grows rapidly from seed and spreads quickly, smothering other vegetation as it goes. It is fairly easy to pull up the plants before they set seed, or you can cut them down, or burn them on site, or, if you are qualified and certified to do so, spray them with herbicide. Before using weedkillers alongside waterways it is necessary to contact the Environment Agency. Additional weed seedlings will germinate after the parent plants are killed off so repeat treatments are necessary.

Rhododendron ponticum is a familiar species which should be controlled.

Giant Hogweed Heracleum mantegazzianum is not known to be in the parish but watch out as it has been seen near Combe Martin, see www.planttracker.org.uk

New Zealand Pigmyweed Crassula helmsi is an aquatic plant not known to be in the parish or county.

For more detail about the law and control measures click on www.gov.uk

Download Word version of this document Here:

Dr Eirene Williams CEnv FCIEEM(Rtd)
Robber’s Hall
Croyde
North Devon
EX33 1PL

T. 01271 890367

E. eirenendw@aol.com

Vacancy on the Council

THERE IS A VACANCY ON THE COUNCIL

Applications are invited from Parishioners who wish to be considered for co-option on to the Parish council.

Please send a letter or email of application to the Clerk by WEDNESDAY, 30 AUGUST 2017.

Please don’t hand your letter to a Councillor as that would preclude them from the voting process.

Meetings are held on the last Thursday of the month in Georgeham Village Hall, starting at 7pm and last for approximately 2 – 2.5 hours. The co-option will take place at the Parish Council Meeting on Thurs 31 August 2017.

Click on the poster below to download, print and share

Or share this link into social media: http://www.georgehamparishcouncil.gov.uk/notices/vacancy-on-the-council/

ABOUT THE ROLE

Parish Council meetings are held on the last Thursday of each month (with the exception of December when it is usually the third Wednesday) in Georgeham Village Hall at 7pm. Meetings usually last for 2 and 2.5 hours.

There are nine seats on the Parish Council and Councillors are encouraged to attend training, usually delivered by the Devon Association of Local Councils. The Parish Council has a budget for training and mileage expenses can also be claimed.

To be eligible as a Parish Councilor, people have to either:

  • Live in the Parish
  • Work in the Parish
  • Have land in the Parish
  • Live 3 miles from the Parish

If more than one person applies to be co-opted, there will be an election by way of a paper ballot.

More information on what is expected of council members can be found here in the Code of Conduct

More information about the Parish Council and its role as a body can be found here

WHY BECOME A PARISH COUNCILLOR?

By becoming a parish councillor you become someone your community will look to for help, guidance and support; a community leader with the power to influence decisions for the benefit of the people you serve. Seeing your community change for the better, as a result of decisions you have helped make, is something that can give you a sense of achievement and pride.

APPLICATIONS BY POST OR EMAIL TO:

Mrs Sue Squire. Parish Clerk. Georgeham Parish Council, Haxlea, 2 Threeways, Bratton Fleming, Barnstaple, EX31 4TG

T. 01598 710526  E. sue@suesquire.com

Annual Parish Assembly – Chairmans Report 2017

Another busy twelve months for Georgeham Parish.
A lot of work has been done on our Georgeham Parish Neighbourhood Plan, a very important document which I think should now be getting near to being submitted and therefore becoming an integral part of the emerging deposit plan for North Devon and Torridge . On behalf of the community I pass my gratitude for the work and effort put in by the team and Parish Councillors that have made this happen.

A major project has just been completed in Georgeham which has seen the overground electric supply cables put underground. Not quite finished yet,we have to get a bund wall built to conceal the Sub Station on the entrance to Davids Hill, but the majority of the work and upheaval is now behind us.

Planning always takes a lot of time and discussion at parish meetings and I do not wish to go into ant detail re specific applications over the past twelve months here this evening , but do wish to convey my thanks to Parish Councillors for their patience and diligence when dealing with difficult and larger applications.

Enforcement actions – some seem to drag on for ever, but recently we have seen that our diligence in keeping the matters that do require action on the agenda do pay off in the end.

We continue to strive for funding for Parish projects, the Playing Field Georgeham is an ongoing example of just how difficult it is for rural communities to secure funding for major projects such as our desire to find the funding for a new pavilion for the Playing Field. Also we now have Croyde Play Park looming up as it now in need of being replaced with new play equipment.

In August last year we lost a Parish Councillor, Sam Hood resigned and was subsequently replaced by Anne Benham-Clarke who is now I hope enjoying her role as a Parish Councillor, one of the jobs that Anne took on a few months ago was the overseeing of the creation of a new Parish Council web site, watch this space it wont be long now before the new web site goes live and interactive.

Higher Ham cemetery has had time and effort put into it over the past twelve months ,the new area is now fully mapped out and ready for use, also considerable work has been put into cutting back the boundary hedge and generally getting the cemetery tidy and nice.

Croyde stream has been dredged from Croyde Bridge as for up stream as the end of St Marys road. This project was driven by croyde resident Mr Steve Gibbs , the parish made a financial contribution towards the cost of this. Mr Gibbs is expecting next autumn to continue down stream with the dredging , funding permitting. A good job well done and appreciated by many.

Finally I wish to express my thanks , on behalf of Georgeham Parish to our District Councillors, Pat Barker and Malcombe Wilkinson and to our County Councillor Caroline Chugg for the work and effort that they put in on behalf of us all.

Lastly A word of thanks and gratitude to Sue Squire our clerk who does so much for this Parish Council and puts up with me.

To those whom have put in work and effort on the many community sports and other things that go on in our parish that I have not mentioned, you are not forgotten, you are all appreciated by this Council and this community.

Thank you.

John Symonds.
Chairman, Georgeham Parish Council.

Download and print the report here at your leisure.

Parish Biodiversity Audit

This document has been produced as a starting point to help community action for wildlife. By starting to bring together knowledge of the natural assets of the parish, it may go some way to achieving its aim of contributing to and stimulating ideas for local action.

It should be emphasised that it is just a beginning. It does not represent a comprehensive account of the parish and is based very largely on existing records held by the Devon Biodiversity Records Centre (DBRC). There will be a wealth of local knowledge that can be used to build upon and improve this report.

Indeed, it is important that it is seen as a ‘living document’ and one that belongs to the parish. It is hoped that it will be added to and refined by the people of Georgeham parish in future years.

Consultation draft – June 2010

Full Audit Document can be found here

Appendix 1 – Map, Notable sites within Georgham Parish

Appendix 1 – Map, Notable species within Georgham Parish

By Anne Harvey

Report commissioned by Devon County Council

Data supplied by the Devon Biodiversity Records Centre

Protocol of the Recording of Meetings

Model Protocol on the filming and recording of Local Council and Committee Meetings.

Adopted on 25/09/14.

The right to record, film and broadcast meetings of Local Councils, committees and sub committees was established following the Local Government Audit and Accountability Act 2014. The “Openness of Local Government Bodies Regulations 2014” became active legislation in August 2014. This is in addition to the rights of the press and public to attend such meetings.

This documents sets out the protocol for the filming or recording of the Meetings of Georgeham Parish Council.
The right of the council to exclude the press and public from parts of Council meetings for contractual and staff confidentially reasons remains unaffected.

Members of the public are permitted to film or record Council meetings, to which they are permitted access, in a non-disruptive manner. The Chairman of the meeting has the authority to stop a meeting and take appropriate action if any person contravenes these principles or is deemed to be recording in a disruptive manner.

The use of digital and social media recording tools, for example ‘Twitter’, blogging or audio recording will be allowed as long as it is carried out in a non-disruptive way and only to the extent that it does not interfere with any person’s ability, including where he or she has a disability, to follow the debate.

While those attending meetings are deemed to have consented to the filming, recording or broadcasting of meetings, those exercising the rights to film, record and broadcast must respect the rights of other people attending under the Data Protection Act 1998. This will include the particular rights of any children or vulnerable adults attending the meeting.

Any person or organisation choosing to film, record or broadcast a meeting of the Council or a committee is responsible for any claims or other liability from them so doing.

The Council asks those recording proceedings not to edit the film or recording in a way that could lead to misinterpretation of the proceedings, or infringe the core values of the Council. This includes refraining from editing an image or views expressed in a way that may ridicule or show lack of respect towards those being filmed or recorded.

The Council will display requirements as to filming, recording and broadcasting at its Meeting venues and those undertaking these activities will be deemed to have accepted them whether they have read them or not.

The Council may itself photograph, film, record or broadcast at its meetings and can retain, use or dispose of such material in accordance with its retention, usage and disposal policies.

The hard copy of the document can be found here to print at your leisure

General Risk Assessment

The greatest risk facing a local authority is not being able to deliver the activity or services expected of the Council.

Risk assessment is a systematic general examination of working conditions, workplace activities and environmental factors that will enable the employer to identify any and all potential risks inherent in the place or practices.

Based on a recorded assessment the employer should then take all practical and necessary steps to reduce or eliminate the risks, insofar as is practically possible. Making sure that all employees are made aware of the results of the risk assessment.

This document has been produced to enable the Parish Council to assess the risks that it faces and satisfy itself that it has taken

adequate steps to minimise them. In conducting this exercise, the following plan was followed:

  • Identify the areas to be reviewed.
  • Identify what the risk may be.
  • Evaluate the management and control of the risk and record all findings.
  • Review, assess and revise if required.

The full document can be found here

Grant Giving Policy

GRANT GIVING POLICY.

Adopted 30 July 2009.

Reviewed and adopted on 25 September 2014.

Reviewed and adopted on 28 January 2016.
ABOUT GEORGEHAM PARISH COUNCIL GRANTS.

Georgeham Parish Council is committed to providing financial assistance towards projects, community organisations and local groups for the specific purpose of improving the well being of the local community.

The Council is prevented in statute from giving financial assistance to individuals.

Organisations which apply must be non-profit making or charitable. Grants will not be made retrospectively and only one application will be considered from an organisations in any one financial year.

HOW TO APPLY.

By letter to the Clerk, details as follows:

Mrs S Squire, Parish Clerk, Georgeham Parish Council,
Haxlea, 2 Threeways, Bratton Fleming, Barnstaple, EX31 4TG

If you need assistance in this regard, please do not hesitate to contact the Clerk on 01598 710526 or by email: sue@suesquire.com

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA.

1. Applicants must be a non-profit making/charitable organisation operating within the Parish of Georgeham. Organisations should be registered as a charity, but non-registered organisations will still be eligible if a Management Committee is in place and all other criteria are met.

2. Applicants must have a Bank/Building Society Account with at least two signatories.

3. The applicant’s aims and objectives must be clear and show the direct benefits to the well-being of the community.

4. Applicants must have independently audited accounts and submit an audited financial statement with their application.

TERM & CONDITIONS.

You must use the grant within one year for the purpose in which it was given. Any delays with project timescales must be reported to the Clerk. Unspent grants may have to be repaid.

A hard copy of the policy can be found here to print at your leisure.

Equal Opportunity Policy

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY POLICY.

ADOPTED 29 OCTOBER 2009

Reviewed and adopted on 25 September 2014

Reviewed and adopted on 28 January 2016
Georgeham Parish Council works to ensure equal opportunities are met. We do not discriminate on the grounds of race, age, gender, disability, or religion.

People will be treated with respect and dignity and receive equal treatment regardless of race, nationality, gender, sexual orientation, where they live, disability, marital status and age.

No one will be harassed, abused or intimidated on the grounds of his or her race, gender, age, nationality or sexual orientation.

Incidents of harassment will be taken seriously and will be considered by the Committee.

Code of Conduct

The Members Code of Conduct document available below and produced by the North Devon Council applies to all elected members of Georgeham Parish Council (Members) and extends to members of the public who choose to participate in a meeting (Co-opted members).

At the highest level overview, Members and Co-opted Members should have regard to the Principles of Public Life, namely:

  • Selflessness
  • Honesty/Integrity
  • Objectivity
  • Accountability
  • Openness
  • Personal judgment
  • Respect for others
  • Duty to uphold the law
  • Stewardship
  • Leadership

Please find the full file here for you to print at your convenience: Code of Conduct 2012.docx

Stray Animals

What to do about stray animals:

If you find a stray dog and it has no address tag or telephone number on its collar, please contact your local authority dog warden, via your local council’s Environmental Health Department, who will be able to help you. For any other stray animals, please contact the RSPCA or your local vet for guidance.

Affordable Housing Drop In

CROYDE & GEORGEHAM AFFORDABLE HOUSING DROP IN.

This event, promoted by Georgeham Parish Council was held on February 9 2017. The Rural Housing Enabler of Devon Communities Together and the Housing Allocation and Temporary Accommodation Service Lead of North Devon Council were present to assist people.

General information was provided about Affordable Housing to rent and possible intermediate rent / shared ownership / discounted. Rented housing is accessed through Devon Homechoice and it is simplest to register for this online. It is essential to register, keep details up to date, and stay on the system when it is reviewed each year, around April time. People should always express an interest in properties that they are interested in, even if it appears that there are many others interested.

Older rented housing will be allocated on the basis of general housing need and can go to people from across the District. Newer schemes are prioritised for those with a local connection to the Parish, or if no interest, to the adjoining rural ones or ultimately to North Devon. In broad terms this connection will be 5 years residence, 5 years employment, current employment in certain professions (emergency services, primary or secondary school teacher, agriculture and professional healthcare or social worker), or born / raised in the area but have moved away and still have a parent or guardian living there.

Those who attended the drop-in are all either renting privately, or living with a relative and are seeking more security of tenure or an independent home. Most appeared to meet local connection criteria.

All expressed an interest in both Affordable housing to rent or in low cost home ownership. No information about income or savings was gathered and individuals will need to check affordability with those selling such property. It was made clear intermediate rent / shared ownership / discounted sale home would also be prioritised for local people and that the sale value would be restricted to keep it as an affordable home.

Everyone that attended was aware of a new housing scheme in the pipeline from Pearce Homes. This has planning approval subject to the signing of a Section 106 Planning Agreement. This scheme is for sixteen homes in total and includes 5 affordable, 4 social rented (3 x 2 bed and 1 x 3 bed) and 1 intermediate rent / shared ownership / discounted sale (1 x 2 bed). All 5 rented and intermediate rent / shared ownership / discounted homes will be prioritised for people with local connection.

Cold Weather Risk Assessment

The marathon is a long-distance running event with an official distance of 42.195 kilometres (26 miles and 385 yards), usually run as a road race. The event was instituted in commemoration of the fabled run of the Greek soldier Pheidippides, a messenger from the Battle of Marathon to Athens.

Freedom of Information Act

Waste disposal may be restricted entirely via a disposal ban. The most common and widespread such standard is a prohibition on littering. Where a jurisdiction has authorized a specific place or system for trash collection, deposition or abandonment of trash elsewhere may be subject to civil or criminal penalties